Top Ten Tuesday: Most Anticipated Upcoming Releases for 2020

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

If It Bleeds by Stephen King

If It Bleeds by Stephen King (expected May 5, 2020) – This is the next novel in the Holly Gibney series.  I haven’t even really read the blurb- but like all new Stephen King books, I’m super excited for it.

9781984805997_GirlandStars_FCO_mech.indd

The Girl and the Stars by Mark Lawrence (expected April 21, 2020) – Ugh – This year is going to be my year to catch up on all things Mark Lawrence.  I might even reread Prince of Thorns.  I’m super excited for this one, even if I likely won’t get to it right away.

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins (expect May 19, 2020) – This prequel feels like it is finally my chance to join in with everyone’s love for The Hunger Games.  I never read the books because I loved the movie so much.  I’m sure this book will get a movie too, but I plan to read the book first this time.

A Conjuring of Assassins by Cate Glass

A Conjuring of Assassins by Cate Glass (expected February 4, 2020) – This is the sequel to last year’s An Illusion of Thieves.  I loved that one and I’m confident I’ll love this one too.

Eden by Tim Lebbon

Eden by Tim Lebbon (expected April 7, 2020) – I’d tell you what this is about but I stopped reading after it said eco-thriller.  It made me think of another favorite author, Michael Crichton.

The Kingdom of Liars by Nick Martell

The Kingdom of Liars by Nick Martell (expected May 5, 2020) – This book is set in a world where magic is paid for in memories.  I’m both curious and hesitant about this one.  I can see it being really fantastic, but I can also see the premise setting the book up for trouble. Are there armies of people who remember nothing?  How does that work?  Is magic used sparingly?  I’m remaining cautiously optimistic.

The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin

The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin (expected March 24, 2020) – This novel is based on a short story that was included in Jemisin’s How Long Til Black Future Month? which released last year.  While I wasn’t sure I quite liked that particular story, I loved the concept and I’m hopeful that with a full length novel she can answer some of the questions I had about it.

 

These last three I’ve all mentioned in previous posts, which I’ve linked to below in case you missed them or would like to check them out again.

The Wolf of Oren-Yaro by K.S. Villoso (expected February 18, 2020)

The Book of Koli by M.R. Carey (expected April 14, 2020)

The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones (expected May 19, 2020)

What are your most anticipated releases for the first half of the year?  Leave me a link below so I can check them out!

Top Ten Tuesday: My Winter TBR

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is my Winter TBR, which is pretty self explanatory.  As of right now the plan is to be buried by ARCs in January, but I also have a few buddy reads scheduled.  Send all the positive luck, wishes, thoughts and karma my way.  I’m going to need it!

Zoo City by Lauren Beukes

Zoo City by Lauren Beukes – I read Beukes’s Shining Girls earlier this year and didn’t love it.  But a few of my regular buddy reading friends offered this one up and I couldn’t say no.  I’ve just started the first few pages, but I’m loving it so far!

Raven Stratagem by Yoon Ha Lee The Machineries of Empire

Raven Stratagem (Machineries of the Empire #2) by Yoon Ha Lee – I can count what I’m currently reading in my TBR right?  I have to.  Because the number of books I haven’t started yet is terrifying.  Anyway- enjoying it, but some of the magic from Ninefox Gambit isn’t quite there.

Empire Ascendant Worldbreaker Saga 2 by Kameron Hurley

Empire Ascendant (The Worldbreaker Saga #2) by Kameron Hurley – Also planned buddy reads!  I’m super excited for these even if The Mirror Empire was a slow start for me.  At the end of book one, we were given a glimpse of a character than I’m really, really hoping we can get to know a little better.

A Beginning at the End by Mike Chen

A Beginning at the End by Mike Chen – I’m hoping to get to this after Zoo City and before January.  (Fingers crossed my friends!)  I’m looking forward to it!  Some trusted readers weren’t too excited about Chen’s last book, but I’m hoping his sophomore effort will be a little more polished.

The God Game by Danny Tobey

The God Game by Danny Tobey – Like a darker version of Ready Player One, minus the 80s trivia, I’m super excited for this one too!  (Though if I’m being honest, I’m dreading the length…)

The Better Liar by Tanen Jones

The Better Liar by Tanen Jones – I’m going to need this to break up the SFF heavy beginning of January.  I’m hoping for super twisty turny thriller I can read in a day because I can’t put it down.

Followers by Megan Angelo

Followers by Megan Angelo – This is going to be my PopSugar prompt: Book with a Pink Cover.  Because it’s really just about the only pink cover I’ve got on my TBR.  I’m super excited for it regardless.

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel – I am thrilled about this one!  In addition to being excited about reading Mandel’s backlist, I’m excited to read her new one too.  She’s got a meandering sort of style, but her characters are so full of life I can’t complain.

The Lost Future of Pepperharrow by Natasha Pulley

The Lost Future of Pepperharrow by Natasha Pulley – First – I’m in love with this cover.  Second.  I’m so happy to get back to Thaniel and Mori and their pet mechanical octopus, Katsu.  Early reviews report good things and I can’t wait to see where Pulley goes with it.

The Wolf of Oren-Yaro by KS Villoso

The Wolf of Oren-Yaro by K.S. Villoso – Looking at this cover reminds me of this:

Maybe It's Maybelline Lagertha

Please, please, please.  Let it live up to that.  I feel like I’ve been waiting too long to find a fictional female book character as bad ass as Lagertha.

This covers, like most of it.  Right?!  Be strong blogger buddies.  I know I’m not the only one with an overwhelming January ahead.

What have you got on your TBR this winter?

Top Ten Tuesday: The Backlog

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is a freebie, but there’s a lot of awesome topics coming up in the next couple weeks, about favorite reads of 2019, or most anticipated reads of 2020, so I decided to take a look at the backlog.  About 60% of my reading comes from new-to-me authors- so here are a few of the ones I enjoyed this year and would like to read more of.

Kameron Hurley: God’s War (Bel Dame Apocrypha #1) and The Light Brigade – I know The Mirror Empire was a miss for a few of my blogging buddies, and I do understand, but ultimately I enjoyed it enough that I’d like to read more of Hurley.  The Light Brigade is her highest rated book on GoodReads, and God’s War came recommended by a frequent buddy reader.

Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel

Sylvain Neuvel: Sleeping Giants (Themis Files #1) – Neuvel’s novella The Test was one of my favorites this year.  While I wait for him to write something else wonderful and so perfectly relevant, I plan to give Sleeping Giants (and hopefully the rest of the trilogy) a try.

Wool by Hugh Howey

Hugh Howey: The Wool Omnibus – I flew through Howey’s Half Way Home earlier this year.  It was perfect for me, quick pacing, straightforward writing, and plenty of suspense.  Wool comes highly recommended, and I can’t wait to check it out!

Adrian Tchaikovsky: Children of Time, Redemption’s Blade and The Expert System’s Brother – As prolific as Tchaikovsky is, it’s kind of hard to believe I’ve only ever read Walking to Aldebaran, but it’s true.  I did start Children of Time once, and through no fault of the book (reading slump!) never finished.  I’m looking forward to jumping back into that and checking out a few of these others!

The Singer's Gun by Emily St. John Mandel

Emily St. John Mandel: The Singer’s Gun – I didn’t review it, but I listened to Station Eleven a few months ago and adored it.  It was a very surface level post-apocalyptic / sci-fi story, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.  While looking at what else of her’s I might want to check out, I found the Captain’s review of The Singer’s Gun and immediately added it to my TBR.

The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde

Jasper Fforde:  The Eyre Affair (Thursday Next #1) – I first heard about the Eyre Affair a few years ago, when I started becoming more active on GoodReads.  I put it off for a long time because while the blurb was very amusing, it wasn’t obviously my kind of humor right away.  Early Riser was a book club read for me earlier this year, and it made me laugh quite a bit, so I’m feeling ready to finally tackle this.

David Wellington: Chimera (Jim Chapel #1) and Monster Island – Wellington wrote The Last Astronaut, which I read over the summer and mostly enjoyed.  Until I started writing this post I actually didn’t even realize he had older titles!  Both of these sound like one of my favorite genre mashups: sci-fi meets horror!

Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys

Ruta Sepetys: Out of the Easy – It seems like everything Sepetys writes turns into a best seller, which is why I was surprised to find this hiding on her booklist.  I got as far as “It’s 1950, and as the French Quarter of New Orleans simmers with secrets” before I added this to my list.  Knowing what she’s capable of after having read The Fountains of Silence, I might not even wait until next year.

Revenge by Yoko Ogawa

Yoko Ogawa: Revenge – I had never heard of Yoko Ogawa until I read The Memory Police earlier this year.  It was surreal and dreamlike and admittedly weird, but somehow I couldn’t put it down.  So of course I had to look up which other works have been translated, and I knew right from the title I had to read this.  It’s a collection of short fiction revenge stories- and who doesn’t like those?

Stephen Graham Jones:  All the things.  I meant to read Mapping the Interior in November for Native American Heritage Month, and it sort of slipped through my fingers amidst some clunkers and the too many buddy reads I’d committed to.  I did finally sit down and read it yesterday, and fell in love with Jones’s voice.  The ending is super disturbing, but I think that’s the way it’s supposed to be in a horror novel, right?  Anyway.  I want to read all of his stuff, but here are a few of the titles that jumped out at me: After the People Lights Have Gone Off, Demon Theory, The Last Final Girl, and The Least of my Scars (whose one stars reviewers have admitted to giving it one star because it’s that disturbing).

Have you discovered any favorite new-to-you authors this year?  Who were they?

Top Ten Tuesday: Winter Reads

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s theme is holiday reads, and while I’m sure I could dig you up some Speculative Fiction that happens during holidays (NOS4A2 anyone?) I personally don’t have that many that I know of on my list.  With a two hour delay this morning, and the first real snow of the season falling over New England, I went for books with a winter setting instead.

The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman

The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman – This is a favorite from my childhood, and is probably overdue for a re-read.  But I swear the landscape and setting are so well written, you feel the cold when reading.

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden – This is a Russian fairytale retelling, set in a remote Russian village far in the north, often described as atmospheric by the group I read it with

Early Riser Jasper Fforde

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde – This is a kooky tale about humans who hibernate and a weird urban myth call the Gronk.  There were a few parts that made me chuckle, if you Fforde’s humor is your thing.

The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky

The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky – This was one of my favorite books of the year – and it definitely fits the winter them, being set in Canada, as far north as the Arctic Circle.

Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie

Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie – While this book is less about the wintry setting than others, most of it definitely takes place in the freezing cold! Enough to set my teeth a chattering.

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K Le Guin

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin – When I was doing my research for this post, this book popped up repeatedly.  And since the planet’s name is actually Winter, it would be silly to leave it out.

Cyber Storm by Matthew Mather

Cyber Storm by Matthew Mather – A techno-thriller in which a freak blizzard buries New York in snow and cuts them off from the rest of the world. Described as a techno-thriller, I am curious to find out how the blizzard plays into it.

Good Morning Midnight by Lily Brooks-Dalton

Good Morning, Midnight by Lily Brooks-Dalton – A researcher and astronomer in the Arctic is seemingly abandoned when his radio communication falls silent.  Meanwhile a team of astronauts still in space wonder if they will ever get home after their communications fall silent.  This one seems to have mixed reviews on GoodReads- what do you all think?

Moon of the Crusted Snow by Waubgeshig Rice

Moon of the Crusted Snow by Waubgeshig Rice – An #ownvoices book set in the Yukon on an Anishinaabe reservation.  When the grid crashes, panic sets in as supplies run low, and survivors begin trickling in from nearby communities.

The Wolves of Winter by Tyrell Johnson

The Wolves of Winter by Tyrell Johnson – This book is set in the Canadian Yukon after the fall of mankind due to nuclear war and disease.  Other readers have described the setting as “almost a character itself” which is something I love!

I’ll tell you what I was looking for and couldn’t find- post-apocalyptic, Earth is in eternal winter, book about the survivors.  You know, like The Road, with more people.  Does anyone have anything like that?  Which books made your Top Ten Tuesday?

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Changes in Reading Habits

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is Changes in Reading Habits.  This is a good personal one for me because my habits have actually changed a lot in the past few years, and sometimes it’s hard not to default back to them.  I attribute a lot of these changes to joining GoodReads a few years ago- which I do think, when taken advantage of, can help people reach their reading goals.

Trying New Authors – This is probably the biggest change for me in the past five years or so.  I used to find an author I really loved and just read everything they’d write until I was forced to find a new author.  While my reading stats are currently out of date- at last count 69% of the authors I’ve read this year have been new to me.  (In 2018 it was 65% new-to-me, and in 2017 it was 63% new-to-me, in 2016 I think this number would have ben 15-25%).

Reading more women – For some inexplicable reason I have a tendency to read more male authors.  It isn’t something I’ve done on purpose and I don’t even think I realized I was doing it until I started tracking my reading stats.  At my last count I was at 45% women, 52% men, and 3% non-binary.  This is up from 39% women and 61% men in 2017.

Listening to audiobooks – I’m not a good listener.  It’s just not one of my skills.  I finally started listening to audio books in 2018 and that accounted for 10% of my reading.  This year my tally is only 3%, but I also haven’t counted a lot of the short stories I’ve listened to from Amazon (or the book I’m currently listening to: The Strain!).

Reading Graphic Novels – For a long time, I sort of detested the idea of reading Graphic Novels.  It just doesn’t feel like reading to me.  Like it kind of defeated the purpose?  I still don’t read very many, but the ones I do pick up I love!


I DNF – Okay- so before GoodReads I DNF’d quite often.  But not really by choice?  Typically I’d lose interest and just set the book down one day and not pick it back up again.  This year I decided to choose to DNF because I’m not having the greatest reading year and I’m tired of slogging it through books I don’t like.

So those are the five big ones.  Habits I’m still working on: seeking out marginalized and #ownvoices authors, as well as to stop requesting so many ARCs.  I prefer to be able to mood read- and there’s nothing stopping me from picking up new books at the library if I really can’t wait.

Which of your reading habits have changed over time?

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Science Fiction Reads

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is bookmarks, and while I can’t wait to see what you all use for bookmarks, the truth is, I use just about anything that’s laying around.  I do have a couple of actual book marks, somewhere, and they end up in all kinds of interesting places that usually don’t involve the pages of my book.

So instead, I’m dedicating this week’s T10T to Sci-Fi month, a post that on a SFF book blog is long overdue.  I’m going with books on my TBR, but I’ll include a few for recommended reading at the end.

Gamechanger L. X. Beckett

Gamechanger by L.X. Beckett – I’m reading through this one now and I don’t even know how to describe it.  Set in a world following the apocalypse, where the survivors of humanity are now very careful about how resources are used and reused.  The world is a fascinating mashup of virtual reality laid over reality, and people are judged socially on how kind or eco-conscious they are.  It’s pretty weird, but I’m mostly enjoying it.

Dead Astronauts Borne 2 Jeff VanderMeer

Dead Astronauts by Jeff VanderMeer – Gamechanger looks absolutely tame in comparison to VanderMeer’s new one.  Three “astronauts” are exploring the City where the Company is headquartered (the Company was first shown to readers in Borne, if you didn’t know), encountering all kinds of weird biotech.  The trouble is, they seem to be exploring it across multiple realities, and it’s confusing as all hell to follow.  Feels like a literary experiment gone horribly wrong right now.  I need a plot Jeff!

Golden Son

Golden Son by Pierce Brown – There’s really no excuse for me not having finished the Red Rising trilogy, never mind not being up-to-date on the series as a whole.  I loved the first book, it just took too long to get the second book in my hands.  Otherwise I’d be done with them by now.  So I’m hoping to buckle down and get them finished this month.

The Fifth Sacred Thing by Starhawk

The Fifth Sacred Thing by Starhawk – I read a couple chapters of this and was definitely intrigued, but got distracted by Gamechanger.  I also seem to have a running theme of cli-fi going this month, because much like that one, TFST is set in a world that has been ravaged by climate change.  Built on the old bones of San Francisco, this new city feels very utopian.  The problem?  The world outside the city is very much dystopian, scarce resources, slavery, violence, etc.. What happens when these two worlds collide?

Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee The Machineries of Empire

Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee – This one has been on my TBR for what feels like forever.  I think I own the whole series too, so I’m more than a little ashamed of the fact that I haven’t read it yet.  I’ve seen it compared to one of my favorites: Too Like the Lightning, in it’s complexity, and somewhat to Game of Thrones in it’s family dramas.  I think I’ve been subconsciously putting it off because I want to love it so badly.

The Menace From Farside by Ian McDonald

The Menace from Farside by Ian McDonald – Can I get a happy dance?  Happy book birthday to The Menace from Farside!  It releases today and I’ll likely have it read before the end of the week.  This is an offshoot of one of my favorite SF series: Luna.

The Strain by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan

The Strain by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan – I’m listening to this now, and it’s perfect.  I was a little skeptical at first, that a film maker put his name on a book (after all, why not make it a film?) but I needn’t have been.  A plane lands at JFK full of dead passengers, and nobody understands why or how… That is, until they all get up and walk out of the morgue.  This is scary in all the right ways, with just enough science to make it feel real, and I’m absolutely eating it up.

Micro By Michael Crichton

Micro by Michael Crichton and Richard Preston – It’s highly unlikely that I’ll get to anything beyond the first seven(?!) books I mentioned (and even that feels overwhelmingly optimistic) but I want to read this one soon.  I’ve just been in the mood for some jungle fiction, and that’s something Crichton seems to do very well.  The blurb describes it as a survival horror type story where nature battles technology.  I think typing that just bumped it up the TBR.

Recommended Reading:

TCS_MRK

The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal – This was one of my favorite books last year, and covered so many topics from prejudice and racism, to sexism, and mental illness.  This is about a woman who dreams of being an astronaut, and has the ability and talent to be one, but is held back at every turn, by men who think women shouldn’t do “a man’s job”.

lnm_im

New Moon by Ian McDonald – Described as “Game of Thrones in space,” that description isn’t too far off.  The Five Dragons of Luna, (that is, the five families that control almost everything on the moon) are warring over territory and new markets and politics.  The only thing they all agree on, is that nobody wants Earth interfering in Moon business.  This series is such a treasure for me, even if the books themselves can be difficult at times.  I wish it was getting a little more recognition in the SF realm!

tmato_jk

The Moon and the Other by John Kessel – This is another on that I wish was more widely read.  It’s a slower paced story, not as exciting or as flashy as New Moon (above) but a novel with a little more depth, that gives plenty of food for thought.  It’s about a matriarchal colony on the moon, fighting for independence among a sea of other more traditionally run colonies (not strictly patriarchal, but certainly not matriarchal).

Are you planning on reading anything for SF month?

Leave a link to your T10T posts below so I can see what you are using for bookmarks.  It’s gotta be petter than the crumpled post-it note currently holding my page!

Top Ten Tuesday: Fall Covers

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is fall themed books.  I’m going to be lazy and go strictly with cover colors from my TBR:


There it is.  My arrangement of Fall colored covers.  Have you read any of these?  Are there any I should prioritize?

Top Ten Tuesday: Spooks, Psychics and other Supernatural books on my TBR

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is books I’d give new titles too, but honestly, I’m not that creative.  So in honor of Halloween I’m doing a follow up to my post: Monster Books on my TBR, with a post dedicated to ghosts and the supernatural!

Heart Shaped Box by Joe Hill

Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill – Rock star buys ghost on eBay and chaos ensues written by Joe Hill?  Yes.  Please.

A House at the Bottom of a Lake by Josh Malerman

A House at the Bottom of a Lake by Josh Malerman – Malerman wrote Bird Box, in case you didn’t know, and while I want to read that someday, having seen the movie (which is fantastic by the way) I’m not in too much of a rush.  But seeing that had me adding this- two teenagers find a house at the bottom of a lake and go diving, only to discover they aren’t alone.

The Diviners by Libba Bray

The Diviners by Libba Bray – This is less of a horror novel than others on this list- but it still sounds like a fantastical ghost story.  (And the reviews are really good!)

Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay

Disappearance at Devil’s Rock by Paul Tremblay – I keep seeing Tremblay’s name come up in conjunction with horror.  I also recently read his short story: The Last Conversation, and while I wasn’t wowed, I was intrigued enough that I wanted to read more of the author.  I settled on this book, in which a boy disappears and then a ghost haunts the town.  *Shrugs*  What can I say?  It’s got ghosts.  Good enough for me.

The Deep by Alma Katsu

The Deep by Alma Katsu – A haunted Titanic and a phenomenal cover.

The Possession by Michael Rutger

The Possession by Michael Rutger – This book is a sequel to The Anomaly, which did make it to my Monster Books TBR.  But it’s been getting rave reviews left and right and sounds right up my alley!

Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz

Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz – Short order cook sees ghosts.  I’m told it’s a classic and the series is relatively good to start with.  Also I need to read more Koontz.  Somehow missed him when he was more popular.

Sparrow Hill Road by Seanan McGuire

Sparrow Hill Road by Seanan McGuire – Haunted highways are one of my favorite urban legends, so I knew when I heard about this book I had to read it.  The one book I’ve read of McGuire’s was good fun popcorn horror, and I have high hopes!

Slade House by David Mitchell

Slade House by David Mitchell – I guess you’re supposed to have read The Bone Clocks first, but I don’t really care.  Every nine years on Halloween- the residents of Slade House extend an invitation to an unsuspecting guest.  The problem is, once they enter, they can never leave…

The Shining by Stephen King

The Shining by Stephen King – I know I know okay?!?!  It’s impossible that I am a Stephen King fan and haven’t read this.  But I’ve started it like 10 times and the beginning is just boring alright?  I just need to read it before I see Doctor Sleep.

What about you?  Got any good ghost stories for me?

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Extraordinary Book Titles

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is awesome titles.  I think it’s a great topic because I’m getting a chance to share ten titles I don’t think I’ve ever mentioned here.  I also think it’s pretty self explanatory, so I’m going to take the lazy route and just drop a bunch of pictures and links on you.

Lady Hotspur

Donna Has Left the Building

Passing Strange

The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t With Her Mind

Futuristic Violence and Fancy Suits

The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein

The Trial and Execution of the Traitor George Washington

Sooner or Later Everything Falls Into the Sea

Trust Me I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator

Space Unicorn Blues

Do you like any of these titles?  What books made your list?

Top Ten Tuesday: Character Traits I Love

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is character traits!  I like this topic, but also- it’s not something I’m very good at articulating.  I can point to characters I love and say: “That!” but when asked why I rarely understand the reason.  So I’ll give it my best shot :).

Super Intelligent

TLtL

Mycroft Canner in Too Like the Lightning – Mycroft knows all the things.  Obscure facts it would never even occur to normal people to google.  But also – watch out.  Because book smarts aren’t the only things whizzing through his brain.

Cunning/Crafty

lnm_im

Ariel Corta in New Moon – Ariel is one lawyer you do not want to mess with.  She’s basically everything I wish I had been when I grew up.

Proud

The Last Kingdom by Bernard Cornwell

Uhtred of The Last Kingdom – Uhtred is probably one of the proudest characters around.  I should qualify this statement though, by noting I really only enjoy pride as a trait when the character can back it up with actual things to be proud of.

Sarcastic

Gnomon by Nick Harkaway

Constantin Kyriakos in Gnomon – I think the words I used to describe his chapters were “pure unadulterated joy”.

Liars

The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

Eugenides in The Thief – There are a lot of characters I could mention here: Kaz Brekker, Amber Reynolds of Sometimes I Lie… the list goes on.  But Eugenides is pretty hard not to love.

Introverts

Tuesday Mooney Talks to Ghosts by Kate Racculia

Tuesday Mooney in Tuesday Mooney Talks to Ghosts – My initial thought went right to Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer, but the Biologist really is an extreme example, and I’m not as crazy about her as I was about Tuesday Mooney.  The book describes her as a loner, but I didn’t get that sense.  She has friends, but she prefers a small circle of close friends rather than lots and lots of friends.  This trait I love because it’s one I always relate to.

That Guy Who’s Really Just a Great Friend

Traitors Blade by Sebastien de Castell

Falcio Val Mond of The Greatcoats – It’s hard to put a finger on why I love Falcio so much, but I think it comes down to what a great friend he is, and how much he cares about the people around him.

That Girl Who Can’t Adult

One for the Money by Janet Evanovich

Stephanie Plum in One for the Money – Perhaps even more relatable than being introverted, as I am that girl who can’t adult.  Sure, I don’t have two boyfriends, or a gun toting, spandex wearing BFF, but pretty much everything else about Stephanie’s life applies.

Hairy Breeches

Ragnar Lodbrok 2

No, Hairy Breeches isn’t really a favorite quality.  It’s just what Lodbrok means.  And no character list of mine would be complete without mentioning the fictional portrayal of Ragnar Lodbrok in History Channel’s Vikings.  I guess it’s not much of a surprise considering he possesses 5 of these 9 traits (6 out of 9 if we’re counting hairy breeches, which he never actually wears).

That’s it for me!  What are your favorite character traits?