Book Haul!

Hello friends! I haven’t been too consistent since I returned from a small hiatus over Christmas and New Years.  I’m hoping to get that fixed next week.  There were lots of household chores that needed catching up on too.

I’ve been on a no book buying ban for quite some time- but I still love the book store because it’s much easier to browse my local Barnes & Noble than it ever has been my local library, which groups all the fiction from every genre together.  (Why?!)  So between having a longing to browse and a gift card and a big B&N sale, I picked up a few things.

Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood

Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood – This was in my 20 in ’20 list, and the price was right and I’m in love with the cover.

Oryx and Crake is at once an unforgettable love story and a compelling vision of the future. Snowman, known as Jimmy before mankind was overwhelmed by a plague, is struggling to survive in a world where he may be the last human, and mourning the loss of his best friend, Crake, and the beautiful and elusive Oryx whom they both loved.

In search of answers, Snowman embarks on a journey–with the help of the green-eyed Children of Crake–through the lush wilderness that was so recently a great city, until powerful corporations took mankind on an uncontrolled genetic engineering ride. Margaret Atwood projects us into a near future that is both all too familiar and beyond our imagining.”

Full Throttle by Joe Hill

Full Throttle by Joe Hill – And it’s signed!  Which seems silly but I love Joe Hill.  This isn’t on any list or challenge that I had planned, but it’s Joe Hill and I’ve been meaning to read it since it released last October.

“In this masterful collection of short fiction, Joe Hill dissects timeless human struggles in thirteen relentless tales of supernatural suspense, including “In The Tall Grass,” one of two stories co-written with Stephen King, basis for the terrifying feature film from Netflix.”

The Marsh King's Daughter by Karen Dionne

The Marsh King’s Daughter by Karen Dionne – Spotted on the clearance racks.  What pulled me in was the description of the scenery, which is marshy, swampy, jungle-ish.  Every once in awhile I get a craving to read something in this sort of setting.  I am a little worried about there being scenes of child abuse (which I don’t like) but I decided to take a chance on it because it’s told from her perspective as an adult, so I’m hoping flashbacks are few and far between.

The mesmerizing tale of a woman who must risk everything to hunt down the dangerous man who shaped her past and threatens to steal her future: her father.

Helena Pelletier has a loving husband, two beautiful daughters, and a business that fills her days. But she also has a secret: she is the product of an abduction. Her mother was kidnapped as a teenager by her father and kept in a remote cabin in the marshlands of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Helena, born two years after the abduction, loved her home in nature, and despite her father’s sometimes brutal behavior, she loved him, too…until she learned precisely how savage he could be.

More than twenty years later, she has buried her past so soundly that even her husband doesn’t know the truth. But now her father has killed two guards, escaped from prison, and disappeared into the marsh. The police begin a manhunt, but Helena knows they don’t stand a chance. Knows that only one person has the skills to find the survivalist the world calls the Marsh King–because only one person was ever trained by him: his daughter.”

After the Crash by Michel Bussi

After the Crash by Michel Bussi – This is a bit outside my typical comfort zone, since it sounds like more of a mystery than a thriller necessarily, but I picked it up because I’m always curious to see how struggles between the working class and upper crust elite play out.

On the night of 22 December 1980, a plane crashes on the Franco-Swiss border and is engulfed in flames. 168 out of 169 passengers are killed instantly. The miraculous sole survivor is a three-month-old baby girl. Two families, one rich, the other poor, step forward to claim her, sparking an investigation that will last for almost two decades. Is she Lyse-Rose or Emilie?

Eighteen years later, having failed to discover the truth, private detective Credule Grand-Duc plans to take his own life, but not before placing an account of his investigation in the girl’s hands. But, as he sits at his desk about to pull the trigger, he uncovers a secret that changes everything – then is killed before he can breathe a word of it to anyone…”

Killing Gravity by Corey J White

Killing Gravity (The Voidwitch Saga #1) by Corey J. White – Picked this up for Kindle.  It was on a deal for $1.99 not too long ago (it still might be).  No idea what a voidwitch is, but I definitely want to know!

“Mariam Xi can kill you with her mind. She escaped the MEPHISTO lab where she was raised as a psychic supersoldier, which left her with terrifying capabilities, a fierce sense of independence, a deficit of trust and an experimental pet named Seven. She’s spent her life on the run, but the boogeymen from her past are catching up with her. An encounter with a bounty hunter has left her hanging helpless in a dying spaceship, dependent on the mercy of strangers.

Penned in on all sides, Mariam chases rumors to find the one who sold her out. To discover the truth and defeat her pursuers, she’ll have to stare into the abyss and find the secrets of her past, her future, and her terrifying potential.”

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire

Every Heart a Doorway (Wayward Children #1) by Seanan McGuire – I grabbed this for FREE this morning.  I know I’m like the only person who hasn’t read it yet, but just in case any of you wanted to check it out.  Nicole @ Book Wyrm Knits recommended it to me, and you can check out her spoiler free review of the most recent book here.

Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children
No Solicitations
No Visitors
No Quests

Children have always disappeared under the right conditions; slipping through the shadows under a bed or at the back of a wardrobe, tumbling down rabbit holes and into old wells, and emerging somewhere… else.

But magical lands have little need for used-up miracle children.

Nancy tumbled once, but now she’s back. The things she’s experienced… they change a person. The children under Miss West’s care understand all too well. And each of them is seeking a way back to their own fantasy world.

But Nancy’s arrival marks a change at the Home. There’s a darkness just around each corner, and when tragedy strikes, it’s up to Nancy and her new-found schoolmates to get to the heart of the matter.

No matter the cost.”

And that’s all the ones from January anyway.  Have you read any of these?  What did you think?

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Spooks, Psychics and other Supernatural books on my TBR

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is books I’d give new titles too, but honestly, I’m not that creative.  So in honor of Halloween I’m doing a follow up to my post: Monster Books on my TBR, with a post dedicated to ghosts and the supernatural!

Heart Shaped Box by Joe Hill

Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill – Rock star buys ghost on eBay and chaos ensues written by Joe Hill?  Yes.  Please.

A House at the Bottom of a Lake by Josh Malerman

A House at the Bottom of a Lake by Josh Malerman – Malerman wrote Bird Box, in case you didn’t know, and while I want to read that someday, having seen the movie (which is fantastic by the way) I’m not in too much of a rush.  But seeing that had me adding this- two teenagers find a house at the bottom of a lake and go diving, only to discover they aren’t alone.

The Diviners by Libba Bray

The Diviners by Libba Bray – This is less of a horror novel than others on this list- but it still sounds like a fantastical ghost story.  (And the reviews are really good!)

Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay

Disappearance at Devil’s Rock by Paul Tremblay – I keep seeing Tremblay’s name come up in conjunction with horror.  I also recently read his short story: The Last Conversation, and while I wasn’t wowed, I was intrigued enough that I wanted to read more of the author.  I settled on this book, in which a boy disappears and then a ghost haunts the town.  *Shrugs*  What can I say?  It’s got ghosts.  Good enough for me.

The Deep by Alma Katsu

The Deep by Alma Katsu – A haunted Titanic and a phenomenal cover.

The Possession by Michael Rutger

The Possession by Michael Rutger – This book is a sequel to The Anomaly, which did make it to my Monster Books TBR.  But it’s been getting rave reviews left and right and sounds right up my alley!

Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz

Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz – Short order cook sees ghosts.  I’m told it’s a classic and the series is relatively good to start with.  Also I need to read more Koontz.  Somehow missed him when he was more popular.

Sparrow Hill Road by Seanan McGuire

Sparrow Hill Road by Seanan McGuire – Haunted highways are one of my favorite urban legends, so I knew when I heard about this book I had to read it.  The one book I’ve read of McGuire’s was good fun popcorn horror, and I have high hopes!

Slade House by David Mitchell

Slade House by David Mitchell – I guess you’re supposed to have read The Bone Clocks first, but I don’t really care.  Every nine years on Halloween- the residents of Slade House extend an invitation to an unsuspecting guest.  The problem is, once they enter, they can never leave…

The Shining by Stephen King

The Shining by Stephen King – I know I know okay?!?!  It’s impossible that I am a Stephen King fan and haven’t read this.  But I’ve started it like 10 times and the beginning is just boring alright?  I just need to read it before I see Doctor Sleep.

What about you?  Got any good ghost stories for me?

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Auto-read Authors

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This week’s topic is auto-buy authors, and truth be told, I don’t have any…  For starters I don’t have a lot of disposable income, and secondly, I have a fabulous library system.  If I’m diligent about getting my holds in, I really don’t have to wait long for books I want to read, and I’m usually able to pick stuff up right around release.  So instead I’ll talk about authors whose new release books are automatically added to my TBR.

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Madeline Miller – I still need to read Song of Achilles, (and I already own it, I just haven’t gotten to it yet), but I’d love to see where she goes next.

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Sebastien de Castell – I adore his Spellslinger books, and I still need to finish them, but I’m also eagerly waiting for him to get back to adult stuff, because when he writes for an adult audience, stuff gets pretty tense. (Next Release: Crownbreaker (Spellslinger #6), Dec 2019; Our Lady of Blades, ?? – low key freaking out about this one, hadn’t heard of it before right now, I’m okay….).

Borne by Jeff Vandermeer

Jeff VanderMeer – I don’t talk about VanderMeer very often, and weirdly, I wouldn’t qualify him as one of my favorite authors, but his stuff is so unique and so bizarre, that I add everything he writes to my TBR. (Next Release: Dead Astronauts, Jan 2020; A Peculiar Peril, July 2020)

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Ann Leckie – She’s another one that I wouldn’t say is a favorite, but she’s also pretty inventive so I’ll keep reading.

Gnomon by Nick Harkaway

Nick Harkaway – Again, I have some catching up to do with Harkaway, but much like Leckie and VanderMeer, Gnomon had such a unique voice, that whenever he gets around to putting out something new, I’ll be there.

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Malka Ann Older – I’ve got State Tectonics still on my TBR, and I’m working on the last episodes of Ninth Step Station now, but I love how her world building all feels futuristic, without feeling like I’ll never see it in my lifetime.  (PSA: There is now a second season of Ninth Step, AND The Centenal Cycle books are all on a monthly Kindle deal right now!)

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P. Djeli Clark – I’d really love for him to write something longer than a novella!  Something that I could get lost in for a weekend.  Either way- whatever he writes, it’s going on the TBR.

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Nnedi Okorafor – Still working my way through her backlist, but at this point anything/everything she writes is going on the TBR. (Next release: LaGuardia, July 30, 2019; Antar: The Black Knight, Nov 2019; Remote Control, Jan 2020)

So that’s eight- and then of course, I have the following obligatory authors that worm their way onto every list:

Ian McDonald, Ada Palmer, Mark Lawrence, Stephen King, Joe Hill and Bernard Cornwell.

Who are your auto-buy/auto-read authors?  Leave me a link below so I can check it out!

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite books of the past decade

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

First- a belated Happy Memorial Day weekend to all my American friends!  I hope you enjoyed it!  I’m sorry to kick this week off with a T10T when I haven’t posted a single review in weeks, but it was a hectic weekend for my family, filled with grilling, guacamole, sunshine and sprinklers.  My huge library book haul seems to be doing the trick as I will have a couple reviews for you all later this week.

Anyway, I’m looking at this topic and relieved because it seems easier than some of the last topics we’ve had this month, but I’m also wondering if I have a favorite for each year of the past ten.  I guess we’ll find out!

The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky

2019: The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky.  I’ve read significantly less 2019 releases than probably most other book bloggers- but I don’t foresee this changing.  I read this all in mostly one sitting. Not bad for a 500+ page novel! Honorable mentions to: The Test by Sylvain Neuvel, and Luna: Moon Rising by Ian McDonald.

The Mere Wife Maria Dahvana Headley

2018: The Mere Wife by Maria Dahvana Headley.  I also haven’t read that many 2018 releases apparently.  In my review, I only gave this 4.5 stars because the ending disappointed me, but months later I find myself craving more fierce, unapologetic fiction like this book, and wishing for ANYTHING with a similar voice. It really does deserve five stars. Honorable mentions: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, and The Black God’s Drums by P. Djeli Clark.

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2017: The Moon and the Other by John Kessel.  I think this is another that I gave 4.5 stars to instead of 5.  My reason for including this and The Mere Wife (above), is that in the end, I’ve held these novels to a higher standard.  If we’re going by literary accomplishment, I have more respect for them than I do for some of my 5 star reads for 2017.  The Moon and the Other is beautifully written, metaphoric, entertaining, and manages to give lots of food for thought. Honorable mentions: The Will to Battle and Seven Surrenders by Ada Palmer, and Tyrant’s Throne by Sebastien de Castell.

TLtL

2016: Too Like the Lightning by Ada Palmer.  This is a weird one for me.  I absolutely will not recommend it to anyone to read, but it remains as a favorite.  I think if you can read it with buddies who can help you understand the intricacies of the plot and the world building, you’ll get more out of it.  If you are patient, this is one of the most rewarding books I’ve ever read. Honorable Mentions: Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo and The Flame Bearer by Bernard Cornwell.

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

2015: Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo.  I suspect I’m not the only person to slot this for their 2015 favorite.  SoC is the reason I will still occasionally pick up a YA novel despite being disappointed with most other YA offerings (it’s not them, it’s me).  It’s dark and gritty with just the right touch of romance. Honorable mentions: The Just City by Jo Walton and Warriors of the Storm by Bernard Cornwell.

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2014: Traitor’s Blade by Sebastien de Castell. These books are fast paced and the characters and their banter are fabulous.  There’s not a lot of magic- but a little, and I’m more than okay with that.  Fun fact: the author is an actual fencer, and his dueling scenes are better for it. Honorable mentions: Revival and Mr. Mercedes both by Stephen King.

NOS4A2 by Joe Hill

2013: NOS4A2 by Joe Hill.  This is about a vampire from Christmasland.  I know that’s odd.  Don’t question it.  Just go with it.  Honorable mention: Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie and The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker.

Gone Girl Gillian Flynn

2012: Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.  I know Amy Dunne is a sociopath, but she’s a disciplined and brilliant sociopath.  For some reason- along the with The Mere Wife, I’ve been thinking a lot about Gone Girl and wishing there were more stories like this available.  Honorable Mention: Yes, Chef by Marcus Samuelsson and The Rook by Daniel O’Malley.

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2011: Prince of Thorns by Mark Lawrence. Much like Amy Dunne, I find Jorg to be a very compelling as a character.  Also- this is just a delightfully wicked book. Honorable mention: Shadowfever by Karen Marie Moning and Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor.

Sh*t my dad says by Justin Halpern

2010: Sh*t my Dad Says by Justin Halpern.  So this is a weird place to end up.  Anyway- apparently I didn’t read much and definitely wasn’t tracking my reading in 2010.  Don’t let that stop you from checking out this hilarious book. Justin’s dad is definitely a guy I wouldn’t mind drinking a beer with.  Here’s one of my favorite quotes from the book:

“On [Justin’s] Response to Having [His] Tires Slashed ‘Oh, don’t go to the goddamned cops. They’re busy with real shit. I don’t want my tax dollars going to figuring out who thinks you’re an asshole.'”

And that’s it!  What about you?  What are your favorite books of the past ten years?

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Quotes

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

First I’ll apologize, because I am hastily throwing this together in the early hours of the morning not having gotten enough sleep last night.  I think this week’s topic is supposed to be “inspiring” quotes- but I’m not sure how many of those I have laying around so I’m just going with general favorites, and hopefully I can give the spotlight to some books I don’t discuss as frequently.

“I may have to eat you, you unfortunate young macaroon.” -China Mieville, Kraken

“…but politicians run all the big scams. Government’s the thief of all time. That’s why it tries so hard to catch thieves—it doesn’t like the competition.” – Jeff VanderMeer, Acceptance

“In my experience men are curiously blind to aggression in women. They’re the warriors, with their helmets and armour, their swords and spears, and they don’t seem to see our battles—or they prefer not to. Perhaps if they realized we’re not the gentle creatures they take us for their own peace of mind would be disturbed?” -Pat Barker, The Silence of the Girls

:”I call death onto those who don’t know a child when they see a child. Men who think they made the world out of clay and turned it into their safe place, men who think a woman wouldn’t flip the universe over and flatten them beneath it. I have enough bullets for all of them.” -Maria Dahvana Headley, The Mere Wife

“I think there is no person, myself aside, so hated by the ambitious of this world as Bryar Kosala, since those who fight viciously to grasp the reins of power cannot forgive the fact that she could rise so high and still be nice.” – Ada Palmer, Too Like the Lightning

“They say: only exceptional people can cross the borders. The truth is: anyone can cross, everyone has it in them. But only exceptional people can bear to look it in the eye.” -Naomi Alderman, The Power

“The operating theory—lacking any other credible explanation—was terrorism. The president had disappeared to a secure location but had responded with the full force of his Twitter account. He posted: “OUR ENEMIES DON’T KNOW WHAT THEY STARTED! PAYBACK IS A BITCH!!! #Denver #Colorado #America!!” The vice president had promised to pray as hard as he could for the survivors and the dead; he pledged to stay on his knees all day and all night long. It was reassuring to know our national leaders were using all the resources at their disposal to help the desperate: social media and Jesus.” -Joe Hill, Strange Weather

“What if he killed millions? I can guarantee you such a person would not be considered a murderer. Indeed, such a person may not even be thought to have broken any law. If you don’t believe me, just study history! Anyone who has killed millions is deemed a ‘great’ man, a hero.” -Cixin Liu, Death’s End

“Money is life. Poverty kills.” -Nick Harkaway, Gnomon

“Some places, though, were very strict about recompense and fairness. Very serious about resource management, and they considered music to be a resource like any other. Wouldn’t want anyone to get more than they’d earned, because that was what doomed the old world.” -Carrie Vaughn, Bannerless

That’s it!  Leave me a link to your Top Ten Tuesday below so I can marvel at all your fabulous quotes.

Top Ten Tuesday: My First Ten Reviews

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

This was an interesting trip down memory lane for me.  Apparently 2016 was the year of the kindle freebie and bad romance.  On the upside- I realized my reviews have come pretty far!  I’ve gotten better at discussing elements I liked or didn’t like without necessarily talking about plot (although I still do that sometimes).  I’m significantly more aware of spoilers and content warnings and try to leave information that is actually helpful to others whether it’s positive or negative.

Most of these books are not relevant to my blog, so instead of talking about them I’m linking to their GoodReads page and reviewing them in stars and gifs.

The Warrior’s Wife by Denise Domning – Feb 27, 2015 – 3 stars

November 9 by Colleen Hoover – January 1, 2016 – 4 stars

Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James – May 1, 2016 – 1 star

The King’s Curse by Phillippa Gregory – May 7, 2016 – 3 stars

NOS4A2 by Joe Hill – May 15, 2016 – 5 stars

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins – May 16, 2016 – 3 stars

Burns So Bad by Anne Marsh – May 26, 2016 – 2 stars

Deja Dead by Kathy Reichs – June 6, 2016 – 4 stars

Ash by Jason Brant – June 7, 2016 – 4 stars

Dolores Claiborne by Stephen King – June 9, 2016 – 4 stars

What about you?  Which ten books did you review first?  Leave a link in the comments below!

Top Ten Tuesday: Rainy Day Reads

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

I’m just going to be honest and say that I have no idea what a rainy day read is.  Like- on a rainy day do you, for some reason, read something different than you would read on any other day?  Like- “Oh, I’m really enjoying this lovely space opera, but it’s raining out so let me pick up Pride & Prejudice instead.”

Okay, moving on.  If I had to guess I’d go with something comforting- easy to digest, familiar.  And comforting to me basically means lots of Stephen King.

Cujo by Stephen King

Cujo by Stephen King – Since we’re being honest, I am absolutely never going to read this book again.  I’ll never see the film.  It completely ruined the movie Beethoven for me.  It’s one of King’s more tragic works.  But some of the images in this book, and the story itself, have stuck with me for so long, as good books should.  Read at your own risk.

The Dead Zone by Stephen King

The Dead Zone by Stephen King – This is what King would look like if he wrote for PG-13 crowds.  It gives off more of an eerie/creepy vibe than a horror vibe.  It’s an entertaining book, and I’m happy to say that I loved the show too.

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Dolores Claiborne by Stephen King – Another one that I think falls on the PG-13 side of things for King.  More eerie than scary.  Honestly I think this is one of his better works and I don’t think it gets enough attention.  Maybe because the gore level was so turned down?

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Mr. Mercedes (and the whole Bill Hodges trilogy) by Stephen King – True story: the day I finished this book I walked out of my house and saw that exact same smiley face that appears on this book jacket, painted on my neighbor’s address sign.  I had never seen it there before, and at the time my neighbors really sucked.  It seemed like a sign I should move.  Lucky for my lazy ass, they moved first.

Skeleton Crew by Stephen King

Skeleton Crew by Stephen King – Confession time: I don’t think I ever actually finished this book.  It contains a story you may or may not know called “Survivor Type”.  It’s legitimately horrifying.  Stephen King has said: “As far as short stories are concerned, I like the grisly ones the best. However the story “Survivor Type” goes a little bit too far, even for me.”  He’s not lying.  I’m pretty sure I read that one, put the book down for good, and let it haunt me for years.  It still haunts me, actually.  At least sixteen years after the fact.

NOS4A2 by Joe Hill

NOS4A2 by Joe Hill – Like father like son, as the saying goes.  NOS4A2 captures all of the things I love about King’s work, the nostalgia, the simplicity, the theme of good vs. evil.  If I had to compare it to something I’d compare it to IT, but I enjoyed this a lot more, because I actually read all of this the first time I tried it, while my record with IT stands at about 50% still unread.  Also- I’m pretty thrilled for the AMC series, which filmed right here in Rhode Island, and airs on June 2, 2019.

Strange Weather by Joe Hill

Strange Weather by Joe Hill – One of the things that stuck out to me about this story collection, was how very modern and relevant it all felt. Reading this was what really helped me distinguish Hill from his dear old dad.  His story, “Loaded,” was brilliant and something I think everyone should read.

Locke & Key (starts with Welcome to Lovecraft) by Joe Hill – I know a lot of people either love graphic novels or hate them.  I’m somewhere in between?  I won’t turn my nose up at them but I’m pretty picky about what I’ll read.  Locke & Key snuck under my guard because it was Joe Hill, and I’m so glad it did.  These are probably some of the most literary graphic novels out there. I was absolutely attached to these characters, and there were a few times in this series where I sobbed like a baby.

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The Green Mile by Stephen King – So this is the book that originally sparked my love for King, and it’s largely because of the movie.  The movie is one of the few that manages to do a King book justice, somehow.  I have a harder time both reading the book and watching the movie now that I’m older, because they both reduce me to a blubbering mess (it’s the damn mouse, I’m telling you).  When people ask me where to start with King (or even if they don’t) I usually recommend that they read one of his classics and one newer book, and this is the ‘newer’ book I recommend.  It’s less gory than his other works and more relatable.  (You know, for all us immortals with circus mouse friends).

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Under the Dome by Stephen King – What I’m about to say is blasphemy to many, but Under the Dome is not only my favorite King book, it’s my favorite book ever.  I’ve read it three times, usually in the span of two days because I can’t put it down.  I’ve purchased it twice and need to purchase it again (because the others, unfortunately, met their ends as a result of being loved too hard).

I know a lot of you are probably wondering where all the classic King novels are, and the truth is, I probably haven’t read them.  It isn’t for lack of trying.  I’ve attempted IT like, eight times in two or three different formats.  I’ve attempted The Shining three or four times.  I’ve never attempted Carrie, it just doesn’t appeal to me. I blame it on what others call “the slow burn”.  The slow burn is not my thing (I’m looking at you, Gunslinger).  I’ll conquer them someday (I’m reading The Stand now!) but I haven’t yet.

What about you?  What are your favorite rainy day reads?  Leave me a link below because clearly, I need to diversify.

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I meant to read in 2018

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

Here’s a post that could go on forever.  I like to buy and collect books.  It’s just what I do.  I have a shelf on GoodReads dedicated specifically to reminding me about books I own and should read.  The saddest part is hardly any of them are spontaneous purchases.  They are books I legitimately want to read.  I picked the top 10 based on books I meant to plug in for my still unfinished PopSugar 2018 challenge.

Relic

10. Relic by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child – This was my “Book set in the decade you were born” prompt.  I want to read this.  I sort of want to read the whole Pendergast series.  They all sound like a lot of fun.  Plus I loved the movie.  I really don’t know why I haven’t read it.

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9. Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill – This was my “Book with an ugly cover” prompt.  It’s not really that the cover is that ugly, just sort of plain.  I love Joe Hill.  I love the premise.  No reason for not having started it.

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8. 11/22/63 by Stephen King – This was supposed to be my “Book about time travel” and instead I plugged in Elan Mastai’s All Our Wrong Todays.  It’s the oldest book on my TBR.  I’ve owned it for years.  I looked at a couple of “Best of Stephen King” lists the other day and this was on most of them.  I think the length is intimidating me.

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7. Fall of Giants by Ken Follett – Okay so this was actually listed in my Around the Year in 52 books challenge for the prompt “A book that scares or intimidates you”.  It looks like I ended up changing it to State of Fear by Michael Crichton, which took me like 6 or 7 weeks to read.  I love Ken Follett’s Pillars of the Earth series but I’ve been nervous to try anything else by him, like nothing else will ever live up to those books (they probably won’t).

6. Golden Son and Morning Star by Pierce Brown – THESE BOOKS.  I read Red Rising and loved it.  Seriously- I was over the moon crazy about it.  I immediately went out and purchased Morning Star, but was disappointed to find I had to order Golden Son because it was out of stock.  By the time I received it, I was already reading something else and I just never got back to them.  They’ve been on my list for TWO YEARS.  They were originally slated for “Past GoodReads Choice Awards Winner” and “Next book in a series you started” which I replaced with Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari and Necessity by Jo Walton.  No regrets about what I actually read, but man I would like to get these off my list.

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5. Leviathan Wakes by James Corey – I *think* this was my original “Book set on another planet” prompt, but I ended up plugging Provenance by Ann Leckie in instead.  This book and series comes so highly recommended.  No idea why I haven’t picked it up.

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4. Consider Phlebas by Iain Banks – I actually can’t remember what I had this plugged for.  I just know that I really, really wanted to read it last year.  I bought it in 2017, planned to read it with a group this past December, and then the dreaded reading slump hit.

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3. Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson – This was plugged for my “book with your favorite color in the title”.  Red isn’t really my favorite color.  I don’t really have a favorite.  Blue and purple are probably more accurate than red, but I needed an excuse to plug this in somewhere and it had a color in the title. I ended up plugging The Black God’s Drums instead, and had no regrets about that either.

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2. The Once and Future King by T.H.White – Another one I’ve owned for two years, had on two/three different lists for two years, planned multiple group reads for it.  I’m supposed to be reading this right now actually.  I wish I was joking.  I haven’t even read the first line.  Le sigh.

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1. The War of the Wolf by Bernard Cornwell – This was supposed to be: “Book with an animal in the title”.  I’ve been waiting for it for over a year.  I might not actually ever read it.  I’m too scared Uhtred will die and life will become meaningless.  Should I read it and stop before the end?  I don’t know.

Other stuff I have no excuse for not having read yet:  IT by Stephen King, Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski, The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman, Assassin’s Apprentice by Robin Hobb, Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky, King of Thorns by Mark Lawrence… and the list goes on.

What about you?  What haven’t you read yet?  Leave me a link below and I’ll come check out your list!